Topic: Government Documents

  • Letter from Larry Andrews about Fred Myers, to a U.S. Senate Subcommittee, 1958

    This is a four-page letter, with attachments, from HSUS co-founder Larry Andrews to a U.S. Senate Judiciary Subcommittee, concerning testimony given by another HSUS co-founder, Fred Myers, in March 1956. The letter was among documents obtained via a 2009 Freedom of Information Act request made of the FBI.

    Andrews left HSUS in 1956 to lead the Arizona Humane Society, but remained on HSUS’s Board of Directors until April 1958. This letter dates from the month after Andrews became fully detached from HSUS.

    In his letter and its attachments, Andrews outlines a half-dozen instances in which Fred Myers allegedly perjured himself during his testimony, writing:

    I feel that I have a moral obligation to bring these facts, and my conclusions, to the attention of Senator [James] Eastland’s committee and perhaps to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Two reasons motivate me. First, my conviction that Myers is a communist and hence an enemy of our country. Second, that unless he is exposed and dismissed from his position, he will continue to dupe sincere, but gullible persons of wealth in the humane movement. I have a feeling of guilt for being the means of permitting the communists to infiltrate the humane movement. I alone am responsible for Myers being placed where he could create dissention and perhaps provide the communists with another “front.”

    In his Protecting All Animals: A fifty-year history of the Humane Society of the United States, HSUS’s Bernard Unti dismisses concerns about Fred Myers’ communist ties as a conspiracy of enemies:

    The rift between The HSUS and AHA [the American Humane Association] created considerable ill will and even sparked rumors linking Fred Myers to the Communist Party … Myers appeared before the Senate Internal Security Committee to refute the accusation that he had been a member of the Communist Party while active in a newspaper writers’ union during the 1930s. The charge followed Myers, as antagonists both within and outside the movement resurrected it to tarnish both his reputation and that of The HSUS. [p. 4]

    On the contrary, this letter shows clearly that one of the men who knew Myers best—one of his HSUS co-founders—believed that he was a communist, and that he may have started HSUS as part of a larger plan to provide 1950s communists in America with a “front” group to offer them legitimacy and much-needed money.

    Posted on 03/12/2013 at 9:59 pm by The HumaneWatch.org Team.

    Topics: CorrespondenceGovernment Documents

    Permalink

  • 2010 HSUS Form 990

    This is the Form 990 (tax return) filed by the Humane Society of the United States for the tax year 2010. It was filed with the IRS on September 2, 2010. At 146 pages, this tax return covers most financial aspects of HSUS, and provides accounting details unavailable anywhere else.

    According to this tax return, less than 1 percent of the HSUS budget in 2010 consisted of grants to real “humane societies” and other hands-on pet shelter groups in the United States.

    Here are some other highlights:

    • Total revenue: $148.7 million
    • Total expenses: $126.4 million
    • Net assets as of December 31, 2009: $187.5 million
    • Fundraising expenses: $24.3 million
    • Salaries and benefits: $36.2 million
    • Pension contributions: $2.6 million
    • Total grants to other groups: $5.3 million
    • Grants to ballot-initiative political front groups: $1.75 million
    • Funds passed through to the HSUS-affiliated “Humane Society International”: $1.7 million

    Posted on 10/11/2011 at 5:33 pm by The HumaneWatch.org Team.

    Topics: Financial DocumentsGovernment Documents

    Permalink

  • 2003 Wildlife Land Trust Form 990

     This is the Form 990 tax return that the HSUS Wildlife Land Trust filed with the IRS for fiscal year 2003.

    Total revenue: $4,109,230

    Total expenses: $3,740,704

    Net assets and end of year: $2,699,112

    Posted on 03/04/2011 at 11:35 pm by The HumaneWatch.org Team.

    Topics: Financial DocumentsGovernment Documents

    Permalink

  • 2002 Wildlife Land Trust Form 990

     This is the Form 990 tax return that the HSUS Wildlife Land Trust filed with the IRS for fiscal year 2002.

    Total revenue: $3,934,632

    Total expenses: $3,569,430

    Net assets and end of year: $2,330,586

    Posted on 03/04/2011 at 11:34 pm by The HumaneWatch.org Team.

    Topics: Financial DocumentsGovernment Documents

    Permalink

  • 2001 Wildlife Land Trust Form 990

     This is the Form 990 tax return that the HSUS Wildlife Land Trust filed with the IRS for fiscal year 2001.

    Total revenue: $3,541,995

    Total expenses: $3,392,486

    Net assets and end of year: $1,965,384

    Posted on 03/04/2011 at 11:33 pm by The HumaneWatch.org Team.

    Topics: Financial DocumentsGovernment Documents

    Permalink

  • 2000 Wildlife Land Trust Form 990

     This is the Form 990 tax return that the HSUS Wildlife Land Trust filed with the IRS for fiscal year 2000.

    Total revenue: $4,751,650

    Total expenses: $4,625,261

    Net assets and end of year: $1,815,875

    Posted on 03/04/2011 at 11:31 pm by The HumaneWatch.org Team.

    Topics: Financial DocumentsGovernment Documents

    Permalink

  • IRS Tax Filings, Global Animal Partnership

    On this page are links to the federal income tax returns filed by the Global Animal Partnership (GAP) from its inception in 2005 through the end of 2009.

    GAP was originally founded by Whole Foods Market as the "Animal Compassion Foundation." After a later name-change, it added Humane Society of the United States CEO Wayne Pacelle to its board and hired HSUS Vice President away to be its Executive Director.

    Because GAP was organized as a "private foundation," it files a tax return (Form 990-PF) that discloses where its funding comes from. Through the end of 2009, Whole Foods contributed $1.42 million to GAP, amounting to 77 percent of all reported donations. (Most of the remainder came via a $380,000 contribution in 2009 sent through a "donor-advised fund" that masked the money's source.

    In 2010 Whole Foods announced that it would begin implementing a 5-tier animal welfare rating system administered by GAP.

         

    Posted on 02/23/2011 at 3:24 am by The HumaneWatch.org Team.

    Topics: Financial DocumentsGovernment DocumentsLegal Documents

    Permalink

  • HSUS Freedom of Information Act Requests to the USDA, 2010

    This document contains a set of all of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests made by the Humane Society of the United States to the U.S. Department of Agriculture during 2010.

    In total, HSUS made 17 requests, including inquiries for records involving predator control methods (M-44 and sodium fluoroacetate) and licensed animal breeders.

    (Note: This file is 6.5 megabytes. We strongly recommend that you right-click on the “DOWNLOAD” link and select “Save Link As” to save the document to your computer instead of viewing it in your internet browser.)

    Posted on 12/31/2010 at 10:00 pm by The HumaneWatch.org Team.

    Topics: CorrespondenceGovernment Documents

    Permalink

  • HSUS Shelter Evaluation Report to Carson City Animal Services, November 2010

    This PDF contains a 98-page report from the “Shelter Evaluation Services” department of the Humane Society of the United States. It was delivered to the city of Carson City, Nevada, during November 2010. The local Nevada Appeal newspaper first reported on its findings on December 30, 2010.

    According to the Appeal, the city’s Health and Human Services Department, which oversees Animal Services, requested the evaluation last spring. The report is based on a three-day site visit conducted in July to tour the shelter’s current operations, services, and programs. HSUS charges $25,000 for such evaluations.

    The report criticizes the Carson City Animal Services (CCAS) facility for not watering its lawn; causing stray, feral, and otherwise unsocialized cats elevated stress levels through improper housing; insufficient housing for exotic animals, birds, and small mammals; “a complete absence of nurturing animal care and animal enrichment programs”; inadequate animal-handling training for staff members; flawed communication with off-site veterinarians; limited usable animal-housing space; and unhygienic cleaning practices. HSUS also recommended that CCAS “contact local teachers who may be interested in receiving KIND News,” a monthly publication put out by HSUS’s youth-education division.

    The Carson City Board of Supervisors moved to accept most of HSUS’s recommendations on December 7, 2010, shy of building a new facility.

    “We asked for this to get an idea of how we’re doing compared to other communities and to find out if we can be doing better,” Gail Radtke, Carson City’s animal-services manager, told the Appeal.

    However, given that the evaluation was based on a very short visit to the Carson City facilities and that HSUS doesn’t operate or oversee any shelter of its own, it’s unclear why the city paid HSUS for the report, especially amid a statewide budget deficit of up to $3 billion. The super-rich HSUS has yet to explain publicly why it shouldn’t be providing evaluation reports like this one for free.

     

    We believe reproducing this material constitutes a “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Law. If you wish to use this material for purposes of your own that go beyond “fair use,” you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

    Posted on 11/30/2010 at 8:09 pm by The HumaneWatch.org Team.

    Topics: Government DocumentsHSUS Publications

    Permalink

  • HSUS Shelter Evaluation Report to Dallas Animal Services, November 2010

    This PDF contains a 122-page report from the “Shelter Evaluation Services” department of the Humane Society of the United States. It was delivered to the city of Dallas, Texas during November 2010. The exact date is unknown, but The Dallas Morning News leaked a copy online on November 29.

    The report itself was commissioned in December 2009 by Dallas Animal Services, which agreed to pay HSUS $25,000 for the evaluation. HSUS staff spent three days on-site in April 2010, basing their report on their observations in this very short period of time. HSUS reportedly prepared a similarly expensive report for the same organization in 2001.

    The actual funds for the report’s completion were provided by an organization called the Metroplex Animal Coalition (MAC), which describes itself as being “focused on spay and neuter assistance ONLY” (as opposed to live-animal adoptions). However, since MAC’s money comes from dues paid by member groups, and most of its members are themselves animal shelters, it stands to reason that the HSUS report was funded (however indirectly) by private shelters that HSUS should be financially supporting—not the other way around. MAC’s Advisory Board includes one member (out of five) who works for HSUS. Its Secretary/Treasurer chaired a 2010 Dallas fundraising gala for HSUS.

    The report itself criticizes Dallas Animal Services for the way it cares for cats; the lack of stimulation and exercise its dogs receive; flawed communication with veterinarians; a lack of hygienic animal handling; a failure to provide significant space to care for horses and other livestock; and a feeling of “alienation” among its staff. HSUS also complained about how the Dallas City Council, whose interests lie in getting animals off the streets, crosses swords with the animal shelter management’s goal of reducing the number of animals that are euthanized every year.

    Contained on the report’s last page, as a way to establish HSUS’s bona fides, is the false claim that HSUS is “backed by 11 million Americans, or one in every 28.”

    The super-rich HSUS has yet to explain publicly why it shouldn’t be providing evaluation reports like this one for free.

    We believe reproducing this material constitutes a “fair use” as provided for in section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Law. If you wish to use this material for purposes of your own that go beyond “fair use,” you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

    Posted on 11/30/2010 at 6:42 am by The HumaneWatch.org Team.

    Topics: Government DocumentsHSUS Publications

    Permalink